Get ahead in all things VET. Become a member today.
     
Sign up or sign in

VET News

Attracting Industry Experts ... a Journey, Not a Destination

Attracting Industry Experts ... a Journey, Not a Destination image

Attracting industry experts to become VET practitioners: a journey, not a destination, explores strategies to attract industry experts to become and remain VET practitioners.

There is consensus that the Australian VET sector faces several workforce issues, including the ageing of VET practitioners, the high level of casualisation, the need to maintain industry currency as well as increase the capacity of trainers.

The availability, knowledge and experience of industry experts provide great potential for adding value to the VET workforce and addressing critical shortages to ensure the VET sector has the capacity to meet workforce development needs, particularly post-pandemic.

Helping the next generation of workers develop was found to be a key motivator for industry experts to become VET practitioners. The provision of a supportive culture structured mentoring and RTO-supported professional development were considered effective strategies in retaining industry experts as trainers once employed.

However, the process of attracting industry experts to transition to VET practitioners is not a straightforward recruiting exercise. Industry and teaching/training qualifications, the level of remuneration and a perceived lack of career pathways are some of the confounding factors.

The research suggests a means to address both currency of skills and workforce development could be through more flexible 'boundary crossing' opportunities, that is, where VET practitioners move back and forth between the classroom and the workplace.

NCVER's Managing Director, Simon Walker, says, "Becoming a VET practitioner is an ongoing journey, not a destination, involving vocational and educational preparation; a transition to VET; and continual practice and updating of skills to maintain the dual professionalism that is required to train, assess and respond to the changing needs of industry. The continuing debate associated with the minimum qualifications for VET practitioners and flexibility in entry points to the VET profession indicates that further input into innovative and practical solutions is required."

Through interviews and surveys with registered training organisations (RTOs) and VET practitioners, this research explores approaches to attracting industry experts to become and remain VET practitioners.

Download Attracting industry experts to become VET practitioners: a journey, not a destination.

Date posted Nov 25, 2021

Contact us

Need some help? Visit our help section to get answers to your questions.

start livechat